Monthly Archives: November 2014

Charles Peirce 5.284-293

(1) When we think, to what thought does that thought-sign which is ourself address itself? It may, through the medium of outward expression, which it reaches perhaps only after considerable internal development, come to address itself to thought of another person. But whether this happens or not, it is always interpreted by a subsequent thought of our own. If, […]

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Pragmatism and IP Law History, Conjugated

To trace the overlapping narratives of IP history and pragmatism, we begin with the work of legal scholars Oren Bracha and Catherine Fisk. From Bracha and Fisk, we will turn to conventional accounts of the intellectual history of pragmatism––filling in some biographical details of major figures, and briefly pointing out some limitations in the interpretations […]

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Pragmatism and the Cultural Worker: The 19th Century

For the purposes of this project, three dimensions of nineteenth-century pragmatism are particularly relevant. The first dimension, most fully developed in the work of William James, treats life as experimentation, with all certainties accepted, provisionally, “on credit,” and subject to change. As Isabelle Stengers argues, James replaced the skeptic’s emphasis on “habit” with a new focus upon […]

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“The Taste of Any Public Is Not To Be Treated With Contempt” Part One

“NOT ELEEMOSYNARY” The word “eleemosynary” is seldom encountered in modern English. It derives from Medieval Latin, and means: “Of or pertaining to alms or almsgiving,” or “Of the nature of alms; given or done as an act of charity; gratuitous.” Interestingly, the Oxford English Dictionary highlights as significant the appearance of “eleemosynary” in Charlotte Brontë’s […]

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Adam Smith: Productive and Unproductive Labor and the Cultural Worker, Part One

ADAM SMITH: “PRODUCTIVE” AND “UNPRODUCTIVE” LABOR AND THE CULTURAL WORKER   Over the past several decades, many left intellectuals have treated the appearance of forms of work that deviate from the paradigm of the Fordist factory routine as prima facie evidence of a mutation of the capitalist mode of production. As George Caffentzis notes, this has […]

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