Monthly Archives: November 2012

Reading the Dictionary

Well into a project on intellectual property and cultural workers, I have not yet done an Oxford English Dictionary search of the terms “intellectual,” “property,” “cultural,” and “workers.” Maybe that would be productive? The adjective “intellectual,”  French in origin, came into usage in the 14th century, meaning: “Apprehended or apprehensible only by the intellect or […]

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“We Don’t Ever Transgress”

Here are some leftovers from previous posts, on privacy/desire/creepshots, and Lacan: Russell Grigg, translator of The Other Side of Psychoanalysis, on the meaning of “other side” (in French, “l’envers”): “translated here as ‘the other side,’ also carries the meaning of ‘back,’ ‘verso,’ ‘lining,’ ‘underside,’ ‘flipside,’ ‘underneath,’ ‘bad side’–connotations of the unseen, even the obscene, which […]

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Lacan after Nate Silver

Casual readers of Jacques Lacan (like me) tend to gloss over the evolution of Lacan’s thought over time. So much that is foundational was elaborated in the 1950s; so much that is most confusing (at least for those of us who do immediately understand references to, say, “the square root of negative one” or the […]

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C. Wright Mills: The “New Class” and The “Cultural Apparatus”

C. Wright Mills occupies a curious location within the academic Left these days. Once a major source of inspiration for the New Left, Mills’s star has steadily faded [1]. That’s not particularly surprising: Mills is remembered as the author of studies of white-collar anomie and labor bureaucracy,  topics seemingly well past their sell-by date. Nowadays, […]

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